BLACK AND WHITE AND RED ALL OVER
Stephen Dean, Anne Deleporte
Curated by Sara Reisman
April 14 – June 11, 2016
14 avril – 11 juin, 2016

 

BLACK AND WHITE AND RED ALL OVER, Stephen Dean, Anne Deleporte, galerie l'inlassable
Stephen Dean and Anne Deleporte, Winning Icon, 2016,  flag assemlage, gold leaf, adhesive, and video, with sound.
BLACK AND WHITE AND RED ALL OVER, Stephen Dean, Anne Deleporte, galerie l'inlassable
Anne Deleporte, 15 ID Photos, 1996, Id photo on plexiglass.
Stephen Dean, You Are Here, 2015, glass head pins on Chinese calligraphy paper, 47,5 x 60,5 x 8 cm.
BLACK AND WHITE AND RED ALL OVER, Stephen Dean, Anne Deleporte, galerie l'inlassable
Stephen Dean, Crossword: Red,2016  watercolor on paper, mounted on linen, 198 x 198 cm.
Anne Deleporte, After Rothko, After Smithson, After Johns, After Degas, After l’abbé Fouré, After Moholy Nagy, 2016, paper and wax, variable dimensions.
BLACK AND WHITE AND RED ALL OVER Stephen Dean, Anne Deleporte, galerie l'inlassable
Anne Deleporte, 2016, Before Lascaux, paper and wax.
Stephen Dean, You Are Here, 2016, glass head pins, calligraphic paper, 47,5 x 60,5 x 8 cm.
Anne Deleporte, 2016,  After Lewitt, After Sugimoto, paper and wax, variable dimension.
BLACK AND WHITE AND RED ALL OVER, Stephen Dean, Anne Deleporte, galerie l'inlassable
Stephen Dean, Target (yellow), 2008, uncoiled paper dartboard, 91,5 x 91,5 cm.
Anne Deleporte, Black Painting (green pig) & Black Painting (chicks),
2016, paper and black gesso, 100 x 80 x 4,5 cm.
After Muniz,
2016, paper and wax, variable dimensions.

 

A two-person exhibition featuring works on paper by Stephen Dean and Anne Deleporte curated by Sara Reisman. Black and White and Red All Over will be showcased in the three spaces of gallery l’inlassable.

Dean and Deleporte are multi-media artists whose recent artwork converges around the use of color as an immersive device for reading political subjectivity.
In her use of a limited palette, Deleporte’s light blue Murals and Black paintings series is an ongoing exercise in reading the newspaper for its visual content. Painting black and blue,some gold, over all but a selection of images, she transforms The New York Times from news media into surrealist/dadaist rebus through a process of obscuration and filtration.
Dean’s recent artworks demonstrate how diagrams, dabs of paint, and pushpins, among other material, suggest archaic systems of meaning, from his Jugglers and You are Here, to his large-scale Crosswords that are flecked with drops of watercolor to create patterns that can be read as maps and textiles.
Both Dean and Deleporte reinforce how critical the use of color codifies cultures
Sara Reisman is an independent curator based in New York City where she is the Artistic Director of the Shelley and Donald RUBIN Foundation.
Stephen Dean lives in New York City . Anne Deleporte lives in Long Island City and Paris. They three of them have previously collaborated on multiple projects.

It’s an old riddle that begins with the question: What’s black and white and red all over? The original answer is the newspaper. Another answer is a crossword puzzle done in red ink. Punchlines to the joke play off the double meaning of the color red and the past tense of the verb “to read.” The riddle is a remnant from a time before the internet, when print media was the source of all readable news, and the newsfeed as we know it today – the endless scroll of information streaming across the screen – was an unknown phenomenon of the future. Artworks by Anne Deleporte and Stephen Dean in BLACK & WHITE & RED ALL OVER are as mutually tied to “mass media” as to their use of color as an immersive device for reading the political subjectivities of everyday life, affirming how critical the use of color is in codifying cultural associations. In her use of a limited palette, Deleporte’s light blue murals and black paintings are two ongoing series that are an exercise in reading the newspaper for its visual messages. Painting black or blue, sometimes gold, over all but a selection of images, she transforms The New York Times from news media into a surrealist rebus through a process of obscuration and filtration. Dean’s recent artworks demonstrate how diagrams, dabs of paint, and pushpins, among other materials like cigarette papers, suggest archaic systems of meaning, from his Jugglers, and You are Here, to his large-scale Crosswords that are flecked with drops of watercolor small and large to create patterns that can be read as maps, textiles, and code.

For their exhibition BLACK & WHITE & RED ALL OVER, Deleporte and Dean have collaborated on Winning Icon (2016), an installation in the vitrine located on Rue Dauphine, where viewers can scratch gold leaf from a gilded window to reveal a set of shapes and colors inside, behind the glass. Beneath the precious metal, one can begin to see a large-scale assemblage of faded pieces of flags from multiple countries that include Bangladesh, Laos, Colombia… The colors of these flags are subjective in relation to their national symbols: the red disc in the Bangladeshi flag is a sun rising, and the red symbolizes bloodshed in the Liberation War; the Colombian flag has yellow for the gold that has been found on Colombian land, blue for the seas, rivers, and sky, and red for struggle. Dean has made a number of these flags in order to deconstruct the iconic geometry of national and political identification because the symbols continually shift in meaning. Even within one country’s history, the meaning of the colors of the flag change over time, taking on new symbolism as political events unfold, reshaping our understanding of the culture they represent. The flag’s slow reveal behind the gold encrusted window is a metaphor for the process of realization and transformation of political signifiers over time. The picture may appear to become clearer, but as more information is visible, our understanding of the symbols becomes more complex and varied in association. Alongside Winning Icon is a peephole to Deleporte’s video of red flag flutters on the beach, a piece from 2015 that signals a warning.

Deleporte’s black paintings and blue murals use a related technique that she invented for the original large scale blue photo-frescoes. In both color schemes, she employs a process that involves carefully painting around a selection of images from the newspaper. The blue photo-frescos tend to be architecturally scaled, taking up a wall or ceiling beginning with a wheat pasted installation of The New York Times that is integrated with interior architecture, or outdoors, running along a construction fence or covering the facade of a building. The black paintings tend to be done on autonomous, smaller scale canvases that can be rearranged to play with the symbolism found in these newspaper snippets. For BLACK & WHITE & RED ALL OVER, Deleporte has made a foray into red paint, establishing yet another set of rules to the salvaged pages of newsprint. This started with SLAP (2016), an imprint of an Indian woman’s hand superimposed onto an neo-classical anonymous drawing of men’s hands. In the red paintings, more of the image, if not all, is stained in red rather than painted around, or highlighted. In an attempt to interpret these works in psychological terms, they may be read in terms of what each color symbolizes. Red for debt, black for profit. But, like the images that Deleporte’s pain- ting process leaves behind, her choice of these colors – blue, black, and now red – is based on the qualities of light and materiality. It is Deleporte’s selective reading of images that creates a sense of order out of the glut of visual and textual matter we face on a daily basis, while also leaving the door open to the viewer’s subjective reading. Like the news itself, Deleporte’s paintings leave certain details to the imagination. How one image or detail relates to another is part of the experiment. The real mystery is what Deleporte chooses to cover up.

Stephen Dean’s recent work with crosswords continues to explore an interest in the cultural phenomena of color. Playing with illusion and scale, his crosswords are at times large and immersive, taking on an architectural scale. Or, they are expanded in size but retain the newsprint intimacy of crossword puzzles found in the newspaper that seem to go on forever, never to be solved. Dean’s You Are Here series abstractly but systematically engage with a sense of space, if not geographic, then conceptual. What connects the Crosswords with You Are Here is a sense of identification and specificity within the technically produced conditions of the world that surrounds us. So the specificity of buying the daily newspaper in order to do the crossword puzzle is no longer necessary and it has become another searchable data point. Dean’s process resists the ongoing obsolescence of technological supports, reclaiming diagrammatic forms like crossword puzzles, dart boards, and flags, for their foundational value. More meaningful than the tensions of technological transition are the color coded sequences that are embedded within Dean and Deleporte’s respective artistic projects. Dean’s You Are Here marks cardinal points, suggesting directional orientations, and in the Crosswords, the solution to the puzzle is an analysis of color rather than words. Washes of blues and greens overlap with the black and white geometry of the diagram-like puzzles. Open to interpretation, they offer an alternate reading of systems of language and thinking. In reading, or solving, a crossword, one must answer a set of questions that reveal words and phrases that may or may not be thematically unified.
For instance:
Question: What’s a five letter word that the sound a rotten tomato makes?
Answer: SPLATQ: What’s a three letter word for fled or bled?A: RAN Of his You Are Here series, Dean describes his process as a study of space, a flow chart of one as a multitude. His process engages with the idea of the center being marginalized to the shifting role of the self as the pivotal point of view. If politics and culture are continually in flux – as we see in our reading of both the newspaper and flags – maybe the answer is found by looking inward to our individual positions and roles in order to make sense of the larger world. This play with scale, color, and meaning is the thread that binds Dean and Deleporte’s artworks together, giving us a loose set of guidelines for “reading” BLACK & WHITE & RED ALL OVER, one that is not bound by history, or anticipation of the future, but by an appreciation of aesthetic exchange in the present.

Sara Reisman

*

Une exposition de deux personnes présentant les œuvres sur papier de Stephen Dean et Anne Deleporte, sous la direction de Sara Reisman. Black and White et Red All Over seront présentés dans les trois espaces de la galerie l’inlassable.

Dean et Deleporte sont des artistes multimédias dont les œuvres récentes convergent autour de l’utilisation de la couleur comme dispositif immersif pour la lecture de la subjectivité politique.
Dans son utilisation d’une palette limitée, la série de peintures murales bleu clair et de peintures noires de Deleporte est un exercice continu de lecture du journal pour son contenu visuel. En peignant en noir et bleu, avec un peu d’or, sur toutes les images sauf une sélection, elle transforme le New York Times de média d’information en rébus surréaliste/dadaïste par un processus d’obscurcissement et de filtration.
Les œuvres récentes de Dean montrent comment des diagrammes, des touches de peinture et des punaises, entre autres, suggèrent des systèmes de signification archaïques, de ses Jongleurs et Vous êtes ici, à ses Mots croisés à grande échelle qui sont tachetés de gouttes d’aquarelle pour créer des motifs qui peuvent être lus comme des cartes et des textiles.
Dean et Deleporte soulignent tous deux à quel point l’utilisation de la couleur codifie les cultures
Sara Reisman est une commissaire indépendante basée à New York où elle est la directrice artistique de la Fondation Shelley et Donald RUBIN.
Stephen Dean vit à New York. Anne Deleporte vit à Long Island City et à Paris. Tous trois ont déjà collaboré à de multiples projets.

C’est une vieille énigme qui commence par la question : Qu’est-ce qui est noir, blanc et rouge partout ? La réponse originale est le journal. Une autre réponse est une grille de mots croisés faite à l’encre rouge. Les pointillés de la blague jouent sur le double sens de la couleur rouge et le passé du verbe « lire ». L’énigme est un vestige d’une époque antérieure à l’Internet, lorsque la presse écrite était la source de toutes les nouvelles lisibles, et le flux d’informations tel que nous le connaissons aujourd’hui – le défilement sans fin des informations qui défilent sur l’écran – était un phénomène inconnu de l’avenir. Les œuvres d’Anne Deleporte et de Stephen Dean dans BLACK & WHITE & RED ALL OVER sont aussi bien liées aux « mass media » qu’à leur utilisation de la couleur comme dispositif immersif pour lire les subjectivités politiques de la vie quotidienne, affirmant combien l’utilisation de la couleur est critique dans la codification des associations culturelles. Dans son utilisation d’une palette limitée, les peintures murales bleu clair et les peintures noires de Deleporte sont deux séries en cours qui constituent un exercice de lecture du journal pour ses messages visuels. En peignant en noir ou en bleu, parfois en or, sur toutes les images sauf une sélection, elle transforme le New York Times de média d’information en un rébus surréaliste par un processus d’obscurcissement et de filtration. Les œuvres récentes de Dean montrent comment les diagrammes, les touches de peinture et les punaises, entre autres matériaux comme le papier à cigarettes, suggèrent des systèmes de signification archaïques, de ses Jongleurs, et Vous êtes ici, à ses Mots croisés à grande échelle qui sont tachetés de gouttes d’aquarelle petites et grandes pour créer des motifs qui peuvent être lus comme des cartes, des textiles et du code.

Pour leur exposition BLACK & WHITE & RED ALL OVER, Deleporte et Dean ont collaboré à Winning Icon (2016), une installation dans la vitrine située rue Dauphine, où les spectateurs peuvent gratter des feuilles d’or d’une fenêtre dorée pour révéler un ensemble de formes et de couleurs à l’intérieur, derrière la vitre. Sous le métal précieux, on peut commencer à voir un assemblage à grande échelle de morceaux de drapeaux décolorés provenant de plusieurs pays, dont le Bangladesh, le Laos, la Colombie… Les couleurs de ces drapeaux sont subjectives par rapport à leurs symboles nationaux : le disque rouge du drapeau du Bangladesh est un soleil qui se lève, et le rouge symbolise les effusions de sang de la guerre de libération ; le drapeau colombien est jaune pour l’or qui a été trouvé sur la terre colombienne, bleu pour les mers, les rivières et le ciel, et rouge pour la lutte. Dean a réalisé un certain nombre de ces drapeaux afin de déconstruire la géométrie iconique de l’identification nationale et politique, car les symboles changent continuellement de signification. Même au sein de l’histoire d’un pays, la signification des couleurs du drapeau change au fil du temps, prenant un nouveau symbolisme à mesure que les événements politiques se déroulent, remodelant notre compréhension de la culture qu’ils représentent. La lente révélation du drapeau derrière la fenêtre incrustée d’or est une métaphore du processus de réalisation et de transformation des signifiants politiques au fil du temps. L’image peut sembler plus claire, mais plus les informations sont visibles, plus notre compréhension des symboles devient complexe et variée dans leur association. A côté de Winning Icon se trouve un judas pour la vidéo de Deleporte sur les battements de drapeau rouge sur la plage, une pièce de 2015 qui signale un avertissement.

Les peintures noires et les peintures murales bleues de Deleporte utilisent une technique connexe qu’elle a inventée pour les fresques photographiques bleues originales à grande échelle. Dans les deux cas, elle utilise un procédé qui consiste à peindre soigneusement autour d’une sélection d’images du journal. Les photo-fresques bleues ont tendance à être à l’échelle architecturale, occupant un mur ou un plafond en commençant par une installation en pâte de blé du New York Times qui s’intègre à l’architecture intérieure, ou à l’extérieur, longeant une clôture de construction ou recouvrant la façade d’un bâtiment. Les peintures noires ont tendance à être réalisées sur des toiles autonomes, à plus petite échelle, qui peuvent être réorganisées pour jouer avec le symbolisme de ces bribes de journaux. Pour BLACK & WHITE & RED ALL OVER, Deleporte a fait une incursion dans la peinture rouge, établissant encore un autre ensemble de règles pour les pages de papier journal récupérées. Cela a commencé avec SLAP (2016), une empreinte de la main d’une femme indienne superposée à un dessin anonyme néo-classique de mains d’hommes. Dans les peintures rouges, une plus grande partie de l’image, si ce n’est la totalité, est tachée de rouge plutôt que d’être peinte autour ou mise en évidence. Pour tenter d’interpréter ces œuvres en termes psychologiques, on peut les lire en fonction de ce que chaque couleur symbolise. Le rouge pour la dette, le noir pour le profit. Mais, comme les images que le processus de peinture de Deleporte laisse derrière elle, son choix de ces couleurs – bleu, noir et maintenant rouge – est basé sur les qualités de la lumière et de la matérialité. C’est la lecture sélective des images de Deleporte qui crée un sens de l’ordre à partir de la surabondance de matière visuelle et textuelle à laquelle nous sommes confrontés quotidiennement, tout en laissant la porte ouverte à la lecture subjective du spectateur. Comme les nouvelles elles-mêmes, les peintures de Deleporte laissent certains détails à l’imagination. La façon dont une image ou un détail est lié à un autre fait partie de l’expérience. Le vrai mystère est ce que Deleporte choisit de dissimuler.

Le travail récent de Stephen Dean avec les mots croisés continue d’explorer un intérêt pour les phénomènes culturels de la couleur. Jouant avec l’illusion et l’échelle, ses mots croisés sont parfois grands et immersifs, prenant une échelle architecturale. Ou alors, ils sont plus grands mais conservent l’intimité des mots croisés trouvés dans le journal qui semblent s’éterniser, sans jamais être résolus. La série You Are Here de Dean s’engage de manière abstraite mais systématique dans une notion d’espace, sinon géographique, du moins conceptuelle. Ce qui relie les mots croisés à You Are Here, c’est un sentiment d’identification et de spécificité dans les conditions techniques du monde qui nous entoure. Ainsi, la spécificité d’acheter le quotidien pour faire les mots croisés n’est plus nécessaire et il est devenu un autre point de données consultable. Le processus de Dean résiste à l’obsolescence continue des supports technologiques, en récupérant les formes schématiques comme les mots croisés, les jeux de fléchettes et les drapeaux, pour leur valeur fondamentale. Plus significatives que les tensions de la transition technologique sont les séquences codées en couleur qui sont intégrées dans les projets artistiques respectifs de Dean et de Deleporte. Dean’s You Are Here marque des points cardinaux, suggérant des orientations directionnelles, et dans les mots croisés, la solution du puzzle est une analyse de la couleur plutôt que des mots. Des lavis de bleus et de verts se superposent à la géométrie en noir et blanc des puzzles en forme de diagramme. Ouverts à l’interprétation, ils offrent une lecture alternative des systèmes de langage et de pensée. Pour lire ou résoudre un mot croisé, il faut répondre à une série de questions qui révèlent des mots et des phrases qui peuvent ou non être unifiés de manière thématique.
Par exemple :
Question : Quel est le mot de cinq lettres qui fait le bruit d’une tomate pourrie ?
Répondez : SPLATQ : Qu’est-ce qu’un mot de trois lettres pour fled ou bled ? A : RAN De sa série You Are Here, Dean décrit son processus comme une étude de l’espace, un organigramme d’un comme une multitude. Son processus s’engage avec l’idée que le centre est marginalisé au profit du rôle changeant du moi comme point de vue pivot. Si la politique et la culture sont en perpétuel changement – comme nous le voyons dans notre lecture du journal et des drapeaux – peut-être que la réponse se trouve dans un regard intérieur sur nos positions et nos rôles individuels afin de donner un sens au monde plus vaste. Ce jeu avec l’échelle, la couleur et le sens est le fil conducteur qui lie les œuvres de Dean et de Deleporte, nous donnant un ensemble de lignes directrices pour « lire » BLACK & WHITE & RED ALL OVER, qui n’est pas lié par l’histoire ou l’anticipation de l’avenir, mais par une appréciation de l’échange esthétique dans le présent.

Sara Reisman